Homosexuality genetic

Duration: 13min 36sec Views: 677 Submitted: 29.01.2021
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The relationship between biology and sexual orientation is a subject of research. While scientists do not know the exact cause of sexual orientation , they theorize that it is caused by a complex interplay of genetic , hormonal , and environmental influences. Biological theories for explaining the causes of sexual orientation are favored by scientists. The influence of hormones on the developing foetus has been the most influential causal hypothesis of the development of sexual orientation.

There is no ‘gay gene.’ There is no ‘straight gene.’ Sexuality is just complex, study confirms

Biology and sexual orientation - Wikipedia

How do genes influence our sexuality? The question has long been fraught with controversy. An ambitious new study — the largest ever to analyze the genetics of same-sex sexual behavior — found that genetics does play a role, responsible for perhaps a third of the influence on whether someone has same-sex sex. The study of nearly half a million people, funded by the National Institutes of Health and other agencies, found differences in the genetic details of same-sex behavior in men and women. The research also suggests the genetics of same-sex sexual behavior shares some correlation with genes involved in some mental health issues and personality traits — although the authors said that overlap could simply reflect the stress of enduring societal prejudice.

Massive Study Finds No Single Genetic Cause of Same-Sex Sexual Behavior

A genetic analysis of almost half a million people has concluded there is no single "gay gene". The study, published in Science , used data from the UK Biobank and 23andMe, and found some genetic variants associated with same-sex relationships. Advocacy group GLAAD said the study confirmed "no conclusive degree to which nature or nurture influenced how a gay or lesbian person behaves. The researchers scanned the genomes - the entire genetic make-up - of , people signed up to the UK Biobank project, and 68, registered with the genetics company 23andMe.
Few aspects of human biology are as complex—or politically fraught—as sexual orientation. Now, a new study claims to dispel the notion that a single gene or handful of genes make a person prone to same-sex behavior. The analysis, which examined the genomes of nearly half a million men and women, found that although genetics are certainly involved in who people choose to have sex with, there are no specific genetic predictors.